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PC11 Emerging Therapeutic Tools in the Assisted Reproductive Technology Laboratory

Developed in Cooperation with SRBT

Faculty

T. Arthur Chang, Ph.D., H.C.L.D. (Co-chair)
University of Texas Health Science Center
Rebecca L. Krisher, Ph.D. (Co-chair)
Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine
Carlos Simón, M.D., Ph.D.
Valencia University, INCLIVA; Igenomix
Justin St. John, Ph.D.
Hudson Institute of Medical Research
Kiho Lee, Ph.D.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Needs Assessment and Description

In recent years, rapid progress of technology in multiple areas of reproductive medicine, as well as novel technologies originally developed outside reproductive laboratories, have shown great potential that laboratory scientists and physicians may be able to utilize in the very near future. Emerging therapeutic tools, some with great promise while others carry a higher degree of uncertainty, will bring breakthroughs to our understanding of reproductive biology, and at the same time enhance the toolbox available for the laboratory to improve embryo quality and clinical outcomes. Stem cells, including embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), have been credible candidates to derive artificial gametes in vitro and formulate reproductive tissues in vitro or in vivo. The field of mitochondrial function study and replacement for therapeutic and reproductive purposes has seen steady progress under strict regulation and supervision. Gene editing (for example, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]) has become one of the fastest growing areas in biomedical science in the past few years. In addition, extended period embryo culture may shed new light on our knowledge of implantation mechanisms and explore paths toward increasing embryo competence. This live course for all clinicians and health-care professionals in reproductive medicine is designed to thoroughly discuss and address the current status, feasibility, and concerns regarding applications of these quickly evolving technologies in reproductive biology. Participants will have an opportunity to brainstorm possibilities to meet technical and ethical standards of professions.

ACGME Competency
Medical Knowledge
Patient Care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Identify the needs for new laboratory technologies to implement better embryo quality and improve clinical outcomes.
  2. Describe the scientific basis and technical development of key emerging cellular and molecular reproductive technologies.
  3. Discuss potential technical obstacles and ethical concerns regarding clinical application of new technologies.

PC12 Etiology, Implication, and Management of Preclinical Loss

Developed in Cooperation with EPSIG

Faculty

William H. Kutteh, M.D., Ph.D., H.C.L.D. (Chair)
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Mary D. Stephenson, M.D., M.Sc.
University of Illinois at Chicago
Marius Meintjes, Ph.D., D.V.M., H.C.L.D.
Frisco Institute for Reproductive Medicine
Bruce A. Lessey, M.D., Ph.D.
Greenville Health System - University of South Carolina School of Medicine

Needs Assessment and Description

With close monitoring of pregnancies achieved through assisted reproductive technology (ART), and the availability of over-the-counter pregnancy tests, preclinical pregnancies and preclinical losses are being documented more frequently. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of laboratory factors that alter embryo quality combined with an understanding of factors affecting implantation and early embryonic development is essential for clinicians and scientists involved in reproduction. Faculty of this course will present some of the latest research in the fields of reproductive molecular biology, genetics, embryology, and immunology. The knowledge of such research will be applicable to the management of preclinical loss following ART and recurrent preclinical miscarriage.

This live course is designed as an update on endometrial receptivity, endometrial-embryonic interactions, and the genetics of early pregnancy and will be of benefit to a wide variety of health-care professionals, including physicians, laboratory professionals, nurses, and other allied health-care providers.

ACGME Competency
Medical Knowledge
Patient Care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Review the epidemiology of preclinical versus clinical loss.
  2. Describe the molecular and immunological basis of endometrial receptivity and implantation.
  3. Outline the genetics of preclinical loss including the frequency and distribution of cytogenetic abnormalities, and the origins of aneuploidy/polyploidy.
  4. Critically evaluate the management of recurrent preclinical miscarriage and preclinical loss following ART.

PC13 Practical Management of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: From Fertility to Long-term Health

Developed in Cooperation with AESIG, and AE-PCOS Society

Faculty

Kathleen M. Hoeger, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair)
University of Rochester
Heather Huddleston, M.D.
University of California, San Francisco
Anuja Dokras, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Deborah B. Horn, D.O., M.P.H.
University of Texas, Houston

Needs Assessment and Description

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common reproductive endocrine disorder in women. It has a worldwide prevalence of at least 10%. Many women with PCOS struggle with concerns related to weight issues as well as experiencing difficulties with menstrual control and infertility. Diagnosis is often delayed and there is variable approach to the workup in clinical practice. There is a need for practical office-based diagnostic and management strategies that are evidence based. Practitioners will benefit from a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to the management of PCOS to provide the latest information on hormonal therapy, fertility treatment, and weight loss strategies. This live course for physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, psychologists, nutritionists, fellows, and residents will address questions regarding practical management of clinical situations in PCOS. This will include the proper diagnostic evaluation, assessment of metabolic status, use of hormonal therapy for menstrual control, evidenced-based fertility treatment, and weight loss strategies.
 
ACGME Competency
Medical Knowledge
Patient Care
Interpersonal and Communication Skills

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Review the diagnostic criteria for PCOS and apply to all ages of population.
  2. Counsel women with PCOS on the best weight loss approaches.
  3. Apply the best evidence-based approach to fertility and hormonal management in PCOS.

PC14 Ultrasound Imaging to Improve Fertility and Pregnancy Outcomes

Developed in Cooperation with IRMSIG and AIUM

Faculty

Laura Detti, M.D. (Chair)
University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Laurel Stadtmauer, M.D., Ph.D.
Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine
Michael Heard, M.D.
The Heard Institute
James M. Shwayder, M.D., J.D.
University of Mississippi Medical Center
 

Needs Assessment and Description

This live course is aimed at closing the practice gap between “what we see on the ultrasound screen” and interpretation of the images to optimize patients’ fertility, pregnancy, and overall health. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of the use of ultrasound of the female pelvis for physicians, nurses, and ultrasonographers actively involved in gynecology, reproductive medicine, infertility, and early pregnancy. The course will fulfill Continuing Medical Education requirements for American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine credentialing. The course will emphasize the use, interpretation, and applications of 3-D imaging, volume acquisition, and Doppler flow calculation. It will describe performance and optimization of special techniques, such as sonohysterography, for the assessment of uterine cavity morphology and tubal patency. A multidisciplinary approach with radiologists, reproductive endocrinologists, and gynecologists will ensure broad coverage of the discussed topics. Participants will be encouraged to actively take part in case presentations and discussions and will have opportunity for hands-on simulation in manipulating 3-D images.

ACGME Competency
Patient Care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Summarize the appropriate use of ultrasonography in the evaluation of benign pelvic pathology, müllerian anomalies, and infertility.
  2. Discuss the importance of 3-D ultrasonography and Doppler blood-flow assessment in gynecology as well as in reproductive medicine and infertility.
  3. Evaluate tubal patency by using ultrasound techniques such as sonohysterography.
  4. Critically assess early pregnancy imaging to discern normal from abnormal and ectopic pregnancy.

PC15 Müllerian Anomalies and Infertility and Reproductive Consequences: Evaluation and Surgical Management

Developed in Cooperation with SRS

Faculty

Samantha M. Pfeifer, M.D. (Chair)
Weill Cornell Medical College
Joseph Sanfilippo, M.D., M.B.A.
University of Pittsburgh, Magee Women's Hospital
Staci Pollack, M.D.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Needs Assessment and Description

Müllerian anomalies are rare conditions encompassing anatomical variations in uterine, cervical, and vaginal development. These anomalies may be asymptomatic but can also lead to pain, infertility, and other reproductive dysfunction. Most physicians and allied health professionals are not exposed to these conditions during training and as such have little experience in diagnosis and surgical management. With advances in minimally invasive surgical techniques as well as assisted reproductive technology, surgical management of these anomalies is still evolving. Reproductive surgeons are ideally suited to care for these individuals as they have surgical expertise in preservation of reproductive organs as well as knowledge regarding fertility treatment options. This live course is designed for reproductive endocrinologists, reproductive surgeons, adolescent specialists, and allied health professionals who care for women of reproductive age and want to further their knowledge regarding the consequences of müllerian anomalies with respect to infertility and reproduction, as well as diagnostic strategies and surgical management. The course will address the diagnosis and surgical management of common and rare müllerian anomalies utilizing newer diagnostic modalities and surgical techniques. The focus of the lectures will also highlight consequences of these anomalies including their effect on fertility and reproduction. Presenting the diagnosis and management of müllerian anomalies will enhance understanding of these conditions for all health-care providers, and thereby facilitate treatment. In addition, familiarizing the participants with surgical techniques to correct these anomalies will further their skills and broaden the role of the reproductive surgeon.

ACGME Competency
Patient care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Discuss the diagnosis of müllerian anomalies presenting in women of reproductive age.
  2. Describe options for treating uterine and vaginal agenesis. 
  3. Illustrate surgical techniques for treating anomalies that cause clinical conditions such as recurrent pregnancy loss, dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, and infertility.

PC16 Decisions, Decisions: A Framework to Help Patients Confront the Many Tough Choices in Reproductive Medicine

Developed in Cooperation with NPG, LPG, GCSIG, and SART

Faculty

Erin A. Yontz, M.S., A.P.R.N., C.N.P. (Chair)
Kettering Health Network
Susan L. Crockin, J.D.
Crockin Law & Policy Group, PLLC
Jason M. Franasiak, M.D., T.S. (A.B.B.)
RMA New Jersey, Thomas Jefferson University
Jill M. Fischer, M.S., C.G.C.
Long Island University – Post

Needs Assessment and Description

From the initial decision to seek specialty care to making difficult decisions about the most delicate of procedures, patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures are constantly being presented with choices. Throughout fertility treatment as they struggle to build their families, every patient must make many decisions, some of which may have distressing consequences.

Gap analysis indicates that professionals need education to better assist patients in a variety of areas including poor response and efficacy of adjunctive treatments, avoidance of multiple births without sacrificing pregnancy rates, disputes in embryo disposition, role and technical limitations of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) results, and implications of and appropriate counseling for fertility preservation.

This live, interprofessional course for physicians, nurses, and genetics and legal professionals will explore these topics and build a framework with which to guide patients through the corresponding complicated and oftentimes paradoxical decisions throughout the course of treatment.

ACGME Competency
Patient Care
Interpersonal and Communication Skills

Interprofessional Competency
Interprofessional Teamwork and Team-based Care
Interprofessional Communication

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Identify appropriate elements in the treatment of poor responders and associate the efficacy of adjunctive treatments which may be employed in plan of care.
  2. Discuss the various options around frozen embryo disposition, including issues related to abandonment, donation, and consent vs agreement.
  3. Explain elements of the nursing role in patient choice during ART treatment including fertility preservation for social or medical reasons.
  4. Discuss the goals, techniques, limitations, and interpretation of PGS and carrier screening and examine the complex choices faced when patients consider both.
  5. Utilize a team-based approach to integrate comprehensive care practices.

PC17 Caring for Donors, Gestational Carriers, and Intended Parents: Best Practice Protocols, Psychoeducation, Legal Protections, Support

Developed in Cooperation with MHPG and LPG

Faculty

William D. Petok, Ph.D. (Chair)
Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Medical College
Paula Amato, M.D.
Oregon Health and Science University
Karen I. Hall, Ph.D.
The Center for Infertility Counseling and Support
Stephanie Caballero, J.D.
The Surrogacy Law Center, PLC
 

Needs Assessment and Description

The objective of this live, interprofessional course is to present the best practice protocols for mental health professionals, legal practitioners, and medical practitioners working in third-party reproduction. ASRM and ESHRE have published clear guidelines for third-party reproductive care, including screening of donors, gestational carriers (GCs), and psychoeducational consultations with intended parents. Practice settings for third-party services vary from academic faculties or “in house,” where a clinician is a member of a multidisciplinary medical team, to contractors in a private practice setting engaged by one or more medical practices or commercial agencies. Legal professionals often provide services to all parties involved. The legal issues are complicated and require specific expertise in this area of law. It is hoped that the model of ethics, legal concerns, and standards of care presented in this course will encourage all practitioners to incorporate best practices in their interaction and treatment of oocyte donors, gestational carriers, and intended parents. Course attendees will be presented information on inclusive best care practices for the medical care, psychoeducation, screening, legal protection, and ongoing support for gamete donors, gestational carriers, and intended parents. The goal of these best care practices is to maximize success and ensure safety in third-party reproduction in an ethical context.

ACGME Competency
Professionalism
Systems-based Practice

Interprofessional Competency
Interprofessional Teamwork and Team-based Care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Implement the following best practice protocols:
    • Medical screening protocols, medical management of cycles for donors, GCs, and intended parents.
    • Psychological assessment and psychoeducation of gestational carriers, oocyte donors, and intended parents with case study examples of ethical issues related to third-party reproduction.
    • Relevant legal concerns and case studies involving oocyte donors, GCs, and intended parents, including discussion on recent and ongoing legislation which focuses on protection of all third- party participants and implications for future offspring.
    • Psychoeducation for donors including review of risk factors: ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, ovarian torsion, and current research on potential risks of cancer.
    • Concerns in disclosure and non-disclosure.
    • Appropriate legal representations, key contract provisions, and the ethics of informed consent for all third-party participants.
    • Future implications for donors, GCs, and intended parents, including the possible discovery of new medical or genetic information from or about offspring or donors, and potential contacts with offspring and intended parents through case studies.
  2. Develop team-based strategies for multidisciplinary care.

PC18 The Central Role of Cryopreservation in Assisted Reproductive Technology

Developed in Cooperation with ESHRE

Faculty

Giovanni Coticchio, Ph.D. (Chair)
Biogenesi Reproductive Medicine Centre
Aisling Ahlstrom, Ph.D.
Sahlsgrenska University Hospital
Claus Yding Andersen, D.M.Sc., M.Sc.
University of Copenhagen
Arne Sunde, Ph.D.
St Olavs University Hospital

Needs Assessment and Description

The application of cryopreservation in modern assisted reproductive technology (ART) requires appreciation of capabilities and limitations of the different methodological approaches, also in consideration of the diversity among reproductive cells. If applied appropriately, cryopreservation can offer a multiplicity of advantages and opportunities, impacting the safety, efficacy, efficiency, and ethics of ART procedures. However, complete awareness of the importance and performance of cryopreservation has not perhaps been achieved, as suggested by the high incidence of multiple pregnancies and low proportion of babies born from cryopreserved embryos in many countries. Therefore, efforts are required to spread further knowledge on performance and versatility of cryopreservation. This live course for clinical embryologists, technologists, and reproductive clinicians will provide a comprehensive overview of cryopreservation, providing crucial information for its successful use in ART.

ACGME Competency
Medical Knowledge

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Summarize the fundamental concepts of cryopreservation applied to reproductive cells. 
  2. Appraise successes, limitations, and possible developments of sperm and oocyte cryopreservation.
  3. Discuss the different options for embryo cryopreservation.
  4. Describe the versatility and current performance of cryopreservation in oncofertility.
  5. Explain the fundamental role of embryo cryopreservation to assure efficacy and safety in ART.

PC19 Brave New In Vitro Fertilization World: Safety and Efficiency Is All That Matters

Developed in Cooperation with MEFS

Faculty

Johnny T. Awwad, M.D. (Co-chair)
American University of Beirut Medical Center
Botros Rizk, M.D. (Co-chair)
University of South Alabama
Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D.
University of California, San Francisco
Siladitya Bhattacharya, M.D.
University of Aberdeen

Needs Assessment and Description

The practice of transferring multiple embryos to the uterus for the purpose of enhancing implantation in humans has caused a dramatic surge in multiple births across the world, and significant increase in neonatal morbidity and mortality, maternal pregnancy-related health complications, and associated short- and long-term financial and psychological burden. The challenge we face today is to be able to replace into the uterus a single embryo without compromising final outcome. Another challenge is the premature adoption of several technological innovations in the practice of assisted reproduction long before any evidence of direct benefit to patients’ final outcome has occurred. This course is designed for physician specialists in reproductive endocrinology and infertility and allied health professionals, embryologists, and scientists in reproductive medicine. The course will use an active learning style, which consists of a team-based, problem-oriented approach that is highly interactive, allowing sufficient time for thought exchange and experience sharing. Participants will receive a comprehensive update on contemporary practices originally designed for the purpose of enhancing the efficiency and safety of in vitro fertilization (IVF) practice. Faculty will conduct a critical appraisal of the ability of these novel techniques and technologies to support the birth of a healthy singleton with minimal maternal and fetal risks. Specifically, the course will discuss the value of ovarian biomarkers, morphokinetics, freeze-all policy, preimplantation genetic screening for all, and molecular markers of endometrial receptivity in improving the efficiency of embryo selection and implantation. It will also review strategies of final follicle maturation, luteal support, and elective single-embryo transfer (eSET).
 
ACGME Competency
Patient Care
Practice-based Learning and Improvement

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Summarize the usefulness of biomarkers in designing ovarian stimulation protocols and appraise the evidence on the clinical impact of biomarkers on final IVF outcome. 
  2. Describe the morphokinetic events associated with in vitro embryo development and assess the clinical benefits of time-lapse imaging on improving embryo selection. 
  3. Contrast the advantages and limitations of the freeze-all policy in IVF practice and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this policy in selected and unselected couples. 
  4. Identify the benefits and shortcomings of PGS-for-all in standard IVF practice and explore the strengths and weaknesses of the technology in improving final IVF outcome. 
  5. Discuss the principles of molecular screening for endometrial receptivity and explore the cost-effectiveness of screening for failed IVF cycles. 
  6. Describe the physiologic events associated with GnRHa trigger of follicle maturation and design protocols to optimize success without compromising safety. 
  7. Explain the physiologic events associated with the window of implantation and explore the clinical value of luteal interventions beyond conventional progesterone supplementation. 
  8. Summarize the evidence on the outcome of eSETs and develop strategies to implement eSET in an IVF program. 
  9. Identify the need to establish quality measures of efficiency and safety in IVF programs and develop key performance indicators of efficiency and safety in IVF programs.

PC20 Actualidades en Reproducción Asistida: El Punto de Vista Clínico para el Biólogo y un Punto de Vista del Biólogo para el Clínico. Presentado en Español

Developed in Cooperation with AMMR and ALMER

Presented in Spanish only

Profesorado:

Carlos E. Sueldo, M.D. (Preside)
Universidad de California, San Francisco-Fresno
Carlos Simón, M.D., Ph.D.
Universidad of Valencia, INCLIVA; Igenomix
Miguel A. Checa, M.D., PhD
Hospital del Mar, Barcelona
Sergio Oehninger, M.D., Ph.D.
JEVMS - Instituo Jones de Medicina Reproductiva
Benjamin Sandler, M.D.
Reproductive Medicine Associates of New York/ Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Descripción del curso

La gran cantidad de investigación y estudios clínicos en el campo de las técnicas de reproducción asistida (TRA) representa desafíos constantes para que tanto los clínicos como los científicos puedan determinar los abordajes óptimos en la atención clínica diaria. Este curso evaluará conceptos y controversias innovadoras con énfasis en los principios biológicos y aspectos clínicos del diagnóstico, evaluación y opciones de tratamiento en los pacientes que llevan a cabo tratamientos de reproducción asistida. Aplicando conceptos clave y empleando técnicas de vanguardia, los especialistas serán capaces de mejorar sus decisiones de tratamiento así como optimizar los pronósticos en sus pacientes. Este curso será presentado en español y esta principalmente dirigido a especialistas en infertilidad y endocrinología, biólogos y embriólogos.

Competencia ACGME
Evaluación y cuidados clínicos
Aprendizaje basado en la práctica

Objetivos de Apendizaje

Al finalizar el curso los participantes podrán:
  1. Argumentar las controversias en la práctica diaria de TRA así como los pronósticos en la investigación y ensayos clínicos de varias áreas del tratamiento.
  2. Describir manejos clínicos óptimos en TRA para pacientes con diferentes reservas ováricas.
  3. Explorar el papel de las técnicas más recientes tanto de diagnóstico como de tratamiento en TRA.

PC21 Procedure and Technique for Embryo Transfer in Humans

(half-day hands-on course – morning with the ASRM Embryo Transfer Simulator)

Faculty

Alan S. Penzias, M.D. (Chair)
Harvard Medical School/Boston IVF
Kristin A. Bendikson, M.D.
University of Southern California
David Frankfurter, M.D.
George Washington University
Thomas Louis Toth, M.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital
Julie D. Lamb, M.D.
Pacific Northwest Fertility
Mamie R. McLean, M.D.
University of Alabama at Birmingham
James H. Segars, M.D.
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
G. Wright Bates, Jr., M.D.
University of Alabama at Birmingham
George Hill, M.D.
Nashville Fertility Center
James P. Toner, M.D., Ph.D.
Atlanta Center for Reproductive Medicine
Keith A. Ray, B.A.
American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Needs Assessment and Description

Reproductive health professionals receive training in various aspects of assisted reproductive technology and other infertility treatment procedures. There is, however, a widespread gap in training in embryo transfer. There currently is no standardized embryo transfer procedure or method for training professionals entering the field. The objective of this live course for reproductive health professionals who perform embryo transfer procedures is to learn the common best practices in embryo transfer and practice embryo transfer techniques using a virtual reality–based simulator. Learners will use modules of progressive difficulty to develop motor and cognitive skills for performing embryo transfer. The hands-on portion of the course will provide virtually simulated operative steps with increasing levels of complexity, and will store performance metrics for all users for export in standard data formats. The goal is for practitioners to improve their embryo transfer technique.
 
ACGME Competency
Patient care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Describe the steps of an embryo transfer procedure in humans.
  2. Discuss best practice for embryo transfer in humans.
  3. Implement the hands-on experience gained with the embryo transfer simulator in practice.

PC22 Procedure and Technique for Embryo Transfer in Humans

(half-day hands-on course – afternoon with the ASRM Embryo Transfer Simulator)

Faculty

Alan S. Penzias, M.D. (Chair)
Harvard Medical School/Boston IVF
Kristin A. Bendikson, M.D.
University of Southern California
David Frankfurter, M.D.
George Washington University
Thomas Louis Toth, M.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital
Julie D. Lamb, M.D.
Pacific Northwest Fertility
Mamie R. McLean, M.D.
University of Alabama at Birmingham
James H. Segars, M.D.
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
G. Wright Bates, Jr., M.D.
University of Alabama at Birmingham
George Hill, M.D.
Nashville Fertility Center
James P. Toner, M.D., Ph.D. 
Atlanta Center for Reproductive Medicine
Keith A. Ray, B.A.
American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Needs Assessment and Description

Reproductive health professionals receive training in various aspects of assisted reproductive technology and other infertility treatment procedures. There is, however, a widespread gap in training in embryo transfer. There currently is no standardized embryo transfer procedure or method for training professionals entering the field. The objective of this live course for reproductive health professionals who perform embryo transfer procedures is to learn the common best practices in embryo transfer and practice embryo transfer techniques using a virtual reality–based simulator. Learners will use modules of progressive difficulty to develop motor and cognitive skills for performing embryo transfer. The hands-on portion of the course will provide virtually simulated operative steps with increasing levels of complexity, and will store performance metrics for all users for export in standard data formats. The goal is for practitioners to improve their embryo transfer technique.
 
ACGME Competency
Patient care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Describe the steps of an embryo transfer procedure in humans.
  2. Discuss best practice for embryo transfer in humans.
  3. Implement the hands-on experience gained with the embryo transfer simulator in practice.

Full Day

Half-Day