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PC13: Expanding Preimplantation Genetic Testing in the Era of Next-generation Sequencing: Assessing the Impact of Technological Advances on Assisted Reproductive Technologies

Developed in cooperation with PGDSIG

Faculty

Eric J. Forman, M.D., H.C.L.D. (Chair)
Columbia University Medical Center
Mandy Katz-Jaffe, Ph.D.
Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine
Alan Handyside, Ph.D.
Illumina
David Cram, Ph.D.
Berry Genomics


Needs Assessment and Description

The rapid development of high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to an ever-increasing ability to obtain genetic information about prospective parents and their offspring. NGS-based preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy (PGT-A) has become a routine part of clinical assisted reproductive technology (ART) at many centers. However, concerns have been raised with the increasing data and analysis obtained from NGS-based PGT-A. The purpose of this course will be to comprehensively review the clinical application and evidence to support the use of PGT-A in ART routinely and in select patient populations. The variety of testing possible from embryo biopsy and PGT-A will be explored including how to diagnose mosaicism and sub-chromosomal variations in embryos and the clinical implications of these findings. The different methodologies, amplification, and analysis strategies for NGS-based PGT-A will be reviewed as will the potential to go beyond aneuploidy in assessing embryos with PGT. Finally, future directions for research and technological improvement will be explored. This course also seeks to address appropriate genetic screening and counseling to be performed prior to pregnancy and fertility treatment. A variety of topics will provide clinical and counseling tools for genetic counselors, medical and pediatric geneticists, reproductive nurses, reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialists, medical ethicists, and embryologists. Topics will include: Which patients undergoing IVF should be offered PGT? How should embryos exhibiting evidence of mosaicism and de novo segmental imbalances be treated? How should pregnancies resulting from transfer of these embryos be managed? How do different PGT laboratory technologies vary and how does this influence the results in PGT?

ACGME Competency
Medical Knowledge
Patient Care
Interpersonal and Communication Skills

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Review the current evidence for clinical trials to support the use of PGT-A with NGS in different patient populations.
  2. Critically analyze the types of results available from embryos tested with PGT-A.
  3. Clinically manage complex results such as mosaicism and sub-chromosomal rearrangements.
  4. Discuss the different PGT-A platforms available and potential future technological advances.

PC14: Legal Tool Box for the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (REI) Practice

Developed in cooperation with LPG

Faculty

Stephanie Caballero, J.D. (Chair)
LegalCare Consulting, Inc
Sue Jasulaitis
Fertility Center of Illinois
Lisa Rinehart, R.N., B.S.N., J.D.
LegalCare Consulting, Inc.
C. Brent Barrett, Ph.D., H.C.L.D.
Boston IVF


Needs Assessment and Description

The most recent ASRM gap analysis revealed several areas in which the current state of the law and legal compliance are ill understood or confusing. The most striking areas identified include compliance with federal regulation, management of risk and medical error, ever-growing disputes surrounding the use of embryos, and challenges faced by same-sex families. This course is designed to bring together medical and legal professionals including physicians, nurses, advanced practice providers, attorneys, mental-health professionals, and practice administrators to review the current status of clinic and laboratory vulnerability in light of legal challenges and current reproductive case law. This course will present and discuss the current federal regulation and recent case law and provide information about how best to analyze challenges and ensure compliance. It will further review emerging issues in informed consent, including applicable consents for aneuploid embryo transfer, preimplantation genetic testing, and other targeted genetic testing. It will also focus on the challenges of non-traditional families as well as the role of consents and legal agreements to protect them and the clinic. Participation in this course will increase the participant’s knowledge of the basic legal and ethical requirements of statutory compliance, current patient challenges, and updates in case law. Further, participants will have a firmer grasp on how to manage medical errors and unexpected outcomes, and understand the legal implications of new medical technologies.

ACGME Competency
Systems-based Practice
Professionalism

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Identify protocols for managing medical errors.
  2. Discuss trends in recent case law.
  3. Develop protocols for minimizing and managing embryo disputes.

PC15: Coding for Reproductive Medicine Practices 2018

Developed in cooperation with the Coding Committee

Faculty

John T. Queenan Jr., M.D. (Chair)
University of Rochester Medical Center
Beth W. Rackow, M.D.
Columbia University Medical Center
George A. Hill, M.D.
Nashville Fertility Center


Needs Assessment and Description

Every reproductive medicine practice has a legal and ethical obligation to follow a specific set of rules and regulations that determines how reimbursements are calculated. Failure to follow these rules can result in unfair practices to patients and/or legal consequences from government or third-party payers. The problem is that those rules and regulations have become so complex that most professionals cannot understand them without receiving special training. The extensive nature and yearly changes in Current Procedural Terminology codes (CPT) as well as the recent implementation of ICD-10 as a completely new system of diagnostic coding create gaps in knowledge and proper use of these codes for physicians practicing in the field of reproductive endocrinology. The sheer volume of codes is such that most physicians have to hire additional staff with specialized training in CPT coding. The target audience for this course is physicians, practice managers, billers, coders, office mangers, sonographers, laboratory managers, and physician assistants within the field of reprodcutive medicine and infertility. Through lecture, panel discussion, case presentation, question-and-answer sessions along with pre- and post-testing, this course will address the correct rules and regulations governing the use of CPT codes in the practice of reproductive endocrinology, focus on minimization of errors and quality improvement, and deliver information about systems-based resources available to improve accuracy of patient billing practices.
 
ACGME Competency
Systems-based Practice

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Demonstrate correct coding of diagnostic conditions that are typically encountered in the practice of reproductive endocrinology.
  2. Assess their preparation for the complexity of ICD-10.
  3. Identify the correct Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code for surgical procedures encountered in the practice of reproductive endocrinology and list additional resources available to aid with correct coding procedures in the future.
  4. Summarize the rules and regulations required by third-party payers regarding documentation guidelines to verify that physician services were rendered according to medical necessity and in accordance with the requirements of CPT.
  5. Describe the proper steps for successful verification or negotiation of coverage in obtaining third-party payer coverage for fertility services.

PC16: Emerging Therapies for Endometriosis – 2018 and Beyond

Developed in cooperation with EndoSIG

Faculty

Steven L. Young, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair)
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Antoni J. Duleba, M.D.
University of California San Diego School of Medicine
Sawsan As-Sanie, M.D., M.P.H.
University of Michigan School of Medicine
Hugh S. Taylor, M.D.
Yale School of Medicine


Needs Assessment and Description

The incidence of endometriosis is as high as 10% in the general population, and at least 40% in the infertility population, making the disease highly relevant for reproductive-medicine professionals. ASRM has reported a significant knowledge gap and educational need in medical management for endometriosis for both pain and fertility. The current knowledge gap is compounded by a lack of experience with newly emerging medical therapies, some not yet approved. Furthermore, a lack of knowledge within the reproductive-medicine community about pain-centered medical and surgical approaches leads to their underuse in the infertility population. This course will help close these knowledge and practice gaps with presentations from experts in each of these areas about new approaches from a mechanistic and clinical perspective to optimize endometriosis treatment. Designed for clinicians who treat patients with endometriosis and scientists wanting an update on emerging therapies and targets, this course will summarize emerging data on new pharmacological agents and targets combined with a practical discussion of which new therapies can be used for which patients. The course will also feature experts in surgical therapy and neuromodulation for pain management to highlight clinical decision-making in the use of these therapies as informed by both empirical data and mechanisms of action. Together, the activity will broaden both the clinical and scientific views of endometriosis therapy.

ACGME Competency
Patient Care
Medical Knowledge

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Explain the rationale and use of current and emerging medical options in the treatment of endometriosis in both patients with infertility and those with pain.
  2. Assess innovative surgical and neuromodulatory approaches for managing endometriosis-related pain and infertility.

PC17: The Intersection of Psychiatric Disorders and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

Developed in cooperation with MHPG and SREI

Faculty

Lauri A. Pasch, Ph.D. (Chair)
University of California, San Francisco
Sarah L. Berga, M.D.
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Katherine Williams, M.D.
Stanford University
Sheryl A. Kingsberg, Ph.D.
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center


Needs Assessment and Description

Psychiatric problems present some of the most complex cases in the field of reproductive medicine and require an interprofessional approach. Currently, patients with psychiatric disorders commonly present to assisted reproductive technology (ART) practices that often are not equipped to manage the complications these disorders present. As a result, the mental-health needs of patients remain unmet and ART providers and staff can experience significant time demands and interruption of standard protocols. Improved patient care and satisfaction require recognition of the role of psychiatric disorders in the etiology of infertility, implementation of evidence-based intervention strategies, and practical protocols for management by a multidisciplinary ART team. This interprofessional course will address the role of psychiatric disorders in the etiology, treatment, and management of infertility. The major psychiatric problems to be addressed include male and female sexual dysfunction (e.g., erectile dysfunction, vaginismus), mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and eating disorders. The management of psychiatric medications during fertility treatment and pregnancy will be described and a decision-making model for care defined. There will be a major effort to discuss illustrative cases after an introduction to the basic understanding and current evidence. Small-group discussions regarding challenging clinical scenarios will emphasize active learning and sharing of knowledge and experience. This course will benefit all members of the fertility team, including psychologists, social workers, marriage family therapists, physicians, nurses, and practice managers.

ACGME Competency
Patient care

Interprofessional Competency
Interprofessional Communication
Teams and Teamwork

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Delineate the role of psychiatric illnesses in the etiology, treatment, and management of infertility.
  2. Identify, consider treatment options, and optimize management of fertility patients with mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, personality disorders, and sexual dysfunction.
  3. Describe and assist patients in managing psychological effects of fertility medications.
  4. Implement a decision-making model for the use of psychotropic medications during fertility treatment.
  5. Develop effective tools for interprofessional work with patients with psychiatric problems.

PC18: Multidisciplinary Reproductive Care for Transgender Patients

Developed in cooperation with SMRU, MHPG, FPSIG, CSIG, SREI

Faculty

Angela K. Lawson, Ph.D. (Co-chair)
Northwestern University
Molly B. Moravek, M.D. (Co-chair)
University of Michigan
John F. Randolph, M.D.
University of Michigan
Stan Honig, M.D.
Yale University
Erin Berry-Bibee, M.D.
Emory University


Needs Assessment and Description

Transgender patients have unique reproductive needs that often go unmet. Reproductive-care providers are increasingly encountering patients who identify as transgender for multiple health-care needs, including menstrual suppression, contraception, cross-sex hormone therapy, gender-affirming surgery, and/or fertility. Because of the multiple medical, psychological, legal, and ethical concerns regarding the reproductive needs of transgender patients, many practitioners lack the appropriate training and/or have concerns about facilitating such treatment. As a result, transgender patients may experience discriminatory treatment when seeking medical treatment of their reproductive needs. Even in the absence of discriminatory behaviors, transgender patients must overcome unique hurdles (e.g., biological, social, and legal) in reproductive care that require the awareness and attention of health-care professionals. This live course is targeted for reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, general obstetricians/gynecologists, mental-health professionals, nurses, nurse practitioners, legal professionals and other professionals in reproductive care to address the medical, surgical, psychological, ethical, and legal issues in treating transgender patients and will provide direction to providers for how to address these issues in their clinics.

ACGME Competency
Patient Care
Professionalism

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Discuss gender-affirming treatments, such as hormone therapy and surgery.
  2. Explore the reproductive needs of transgender patients, including health screening, contraception, and fertility.
  3. Summarize the psychological issues surrounding transgender patients who present for reproductive care.
  4. Examine their own clinic practices and determine what changes need to be made to their clinic to provide more effective and supportive care for transgender patients.

PC19: Fertility Preservation: The Emerging Evidence

Developed in cooperation with ESHRE

Faculty

Richard A. Anderson, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair)
University of Edinburgh
Antoinette C. Anazodo, M.D., M.R.C.P.C.H.
Sydney Childrens Hospital
Kenny A. Rodriguez-Walberg, M.D., Ph.D.
Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital (Sweden)
Isabelle Demeestere, M.D., Ph.D.
Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)


Needs Assessment and Description

The 2017 ASRM Gap Analysis identified several gaps in professional practice and educational needs for fertility preservation including embryo banking for family building, best practices for laboratories regarding data collection and reporting of embryo banking, and strategies for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations. This course will consider the issues raised by fertility preservation for both medical and social reasons, provide an overview of the state of the art in this field, and address development of best clinical practice in this area, in both cancer patients and transgender individuals. The target audience includes clinicians, laboratory scientists, nursing and mental-health professionals.

ACGME Competency
Patient Care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Discuss the need for fertility preservation in medical and nonmedical populations.
  2. Describe current best practices and identify areas for further development.

PC20: Improving Pregnancy Rates in Assisted Reproductive Technology

Developed in cooperation with Indian-SIG/ISAR

Faculty

Rishma Dhillon Pai, M.D., F.R.C.O.G, D.N.B., D.G.O, F.C.P.S., F.I.C.O.G. (Chair)
Lilavati Hospital and Research Center, Mumbai
Hrishikesh Dattatraya Pai, M.D., M.Sc.
Lilavati Hospital and Research Center, Mumbai
Nandita Pradeep Palshetkar
Lilavati Hospital and Research Center, Mumbai
Ameet Shahsikant Patki, M.D., D.N.B., F.C.P.S., F.R.C.O.G.
Fertility Associates Mumbai


Needs Assessment and Description

Fertility specialists are always looking for ways to improve pregnancy rates for patients but knowledge gaps exist between practicing clinicians and the latest research. For example, clinicians have limited knowledge of embryology practices and embryologists have limited knowledge of clinical practices for assisted reproductive technology (ART). This course for infertility specialists, reproductive endocrinologists, embryologists, gynecologists, and andrologists will help bridge this gap. Through discussion of pre-ART therapy and clinical aspects of ART and a step-by-step laboratory approach, this course will give a holistic approach to infertility to help clinicians and embryologists update and gain basic and advanced knowledge of treatment and management protocols.

ACGME Competency
Patient Care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Review the physiology, endocrinology, and embryology of infertility care.
  2. Discuss the treatment and patient preparation for ART cycles.
  3. Describe a holistic approach to an ART cycle.

PC21: El Factor Uterino en Infertilidad

Developed in cooperation with ALMER and AMMR (presented in Spanish)

Faculty

Carlos E. Sueldo, M.D. (Chair)
University of California San Francisco-Fresno
Ricardo Loret de Mola, M.D.
Southern Illinois University
Marcelo Barrionuevo, M.D.
IVF Florida
Carlos Simon, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Valencia (Spain)
Cesar Diaz, M.D.
University of Valencia (Spain)


Needs Assessment and Description

Uterine factor as a cause of infertility presents a challenge to clinicians and infertile patients in terms of knowing: 1) which study better delineates the significance of this factor; 2) when and how to intervene surgically; 3) if the existing pathology impairs the results of the treatment recommended; and 4) what are current applications of standard treatment options for absolute uterine factor. This course will clarify the indications for specific surgical procedures, and more importantly, when not to perform them. Presentations will analyze the causes and diagnostic means (both invasive and non-invasive) available to clinicians, as well as the treatment modalities commonly used for specific uterine pathologies, including robotic and hysteroscopic approaches. The course will also assess the status of experimental techniques, such as the use of stem cells in Asherman syndrome, as well as the controversy of using a gestational carrier vs uterus transplantation for absolute uterine factor. This course will be presented in Spanish, and is designed for Spanish-speaking gynecologists and reproductive endocrinologists.
 
ACGME Competency
Medical Knowledge
Patient Care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Identify uterine factor as a cause of infertility and the multiple diagnostic techniques available.
  2. Distinguish the role and application of surgical correction through robotic and hysteroscopic techniques.
  3. Compare the use of a gestational carrier vs uterus transplantation as treatment options for absolute uterine factor.

PC22: Strategies Designed to Improve Endometrial Receptivity during Assisted Reproductive Technology Cycles: Promising or Sobering Facts?

Developed in cooperation with MEFS

Faculty

Johnny Awwad, M.D. (Co-chair)
American University of Beirut Medical Center
Mohammad Aboulghar, M.D. (Co-Chair)
Egyptian IVF Center
Bruce Lessey
Greenville Health System


Needs Assessment and Description

Despite significant advances in the field of assisted reproduction, endometrial implantation is poorly understood and remains the rate-limiting step for a successful reproductive outcome. This course will discuss the physiology of endometrial receptivity and pathophysiology of implantation failure, the management of acquired/developmental uterine anomalies, and strategies designed to improve the outcome of recurrent implantation failure. The course will use an active-learning format and is a departure from conventional classroom-based presentations. Using a problem-solving and team-based learning approach focused on discussions of clinical vignettes, this course will review the management approach to acquired/developmental uterine anomalies in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART), including polyps, fibroids, adenomyomas, synechiae, T-shaped uterus, bicornuation, and septation. Strategies aimed at improving the reproductive outcome of recurrent implantation failure such as induced endometrial injury, immune modification therapy, and endometrial genome profiling will be critically appraised. A risk-benefit evaluation of the freeze-all policy, gestational-carrier use, and uterus transplantation will also be discussed. The course is designed for reproductive-medicine professionals at intermediate and advanced levels, including infertility specialists, allied health professionals, embryologists, and scientists.

ACGME Competency
Patient Care
Practice-based Learning and Improvement

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Discuss the normal physiology of implantation and identify the physiological pathways responsible for optimal endometrial receptivity.
  2. Define recurrent implantation failure and explain pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in failed implantation.
  3. Describe the effects of endometrial and myometrial anomalies on ART success, namely polyps, adhesions, adenomyomas and fibroids, and explore management algorithms to improve reproductive outcomes.
  4. Summarize the effects of developmental anomalies on ART success, namely uterine malfusion and resorption disorders, T-shaped uterus, bicornuation, and septation and discuss management algorithms to improve reproductive outcomes.
  5. Summarize the evidence on uterus transplantation and explore risks and benefits.

PC23: The Germ Cell Environment and Its Impact on Gamete Quality

Developed in cooperation with The Society for the Study of Reproduction (SSR)

Faculty

Francesca E. Duncan, Ph.D. (Chair)
Northwestern University
Jodi A. Flaws, Ph.D.
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
Jacquetta Trasler, M.D., Ph.D.
McGill University
Jennifer R. Wood, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska, Lincoln


Needs Assessment and Description

One of the most remarkable events in biology is the union of two single cells - the sperm and egg – and their unique ability to give rise to an entirely new generation composed of billions of cells. Despite the importance and tremendous potential energy of these cells, the male and female gamete are not impervious to damage. In fact, they are highly influenced by the environments in which they grow and develop, and these niches can have a profound impact on their quality and ultimate reproductive potential. Although traditionally, much research on gamete quality has focused on changes that happen at the cellular level in the sperm and egg, the purpose of this Pre-Congress course is to explore how the environment in which gametes develop changes under specific circumstances (aging, obesity, environmental exposures) and how this can influence gamete quality in the short-term and trans-generationally. In an interactive session with the audience, we will also consider the clinical impacts of these germ cell environments and discuss potential strategies to measure, modify, and/or ameliorate them.

This Pre-Congress course complements a Symposium on Tuesday October 9, 2018 (Hallmarks of the Aging Egg – More Than Chromosomes and Mitochondria) which will feature new paradigms in how to assess aging in the mammalian egg.

ACGME Competency
Medical Knowledge
Patient care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Differentiate how germ cell environments (aging, obesity, environmental exposures) can affect gamete quality.
  2. Discuss the transgenerational impact of epigenetic changes and endocrine disruptors.
  3. Review the clinical consequences of altered germ cell environments and consider therapeutic potential and interventions.

PC24: Hands-on Hysteroscopy and Laparoscopy Course

Developed in cooperation with SRS

Faculty

Ceana H. Nezhat, M.D.
Nezhat Medical Center
Bala Bhagavath, M.B.B.S.
University of Rochester Medical Center
Samantha M. Pfeifer, M.D.
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Steven R. Lindheim, M.D.
Wright State Integrated OB/GYN Residency Program
John C. Petrozza, M.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center
John Preston P. Parry, M.D., M.P.H.
Positive Steps Fertility
Divya K. Shah, M.D., M.Ed.
University of Pennsylvania
Stephanie J. Estes, M.D.
Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Linnea R. Goodman, M.D.
Reproductive Management Associates of New Jersey


Needs Assessment and Description

A 15-year perspective of advances in reproductive surgery (robotics, uterus transplantation) as well as a focus on future technology reveal a gap in surgical technique and the lack of safe opportunities for gaining facility in new surgical skills. This course will provide a variety of skill-development opportunities through hands-on training in laparoscopic, endoscopic, robotic, and microsurgical surgical techniques for recent graduates from fellowship programs and practitioners who wish to update their knowledge and skills in performing laparoscopic and hysteroscopic surgery.

ACGME Competency
Patient care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Apply microsurgical principles in hysteroscopic and laparoscopic reproductive surgery.
  2. Perform laparoscopic suturing.
  3. Demonstrate skill in techniques for challenging hysteroscopic and laparoscopic surgeries.

PC 25: Procedure and Technique for Embryo Transfer in Humans

(half-day hands-on course – afternoon with the ASRM Embryo Transfer Simulator)

Faculty

James H. Segars, M.D., F.A.C.O.G. (Chair)
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Alan S. Penzias, M.D.
Boston IVF
Thomas L. Toth, M.D.
Boston IVF
Valerie L. Baker, M.D.
Stanford University IVF/ART Program
Keith A. Ray, B.A.
American Society for Reproductive Medicine


Needs Assessment and Description

Reproductive-health professionals receive training in various aspects of assisted reproductive technology and other procedures comprising infertility treatment. There is, however, a widespread gap in training in embryo transfer. There currently is no standardized embryo-transfer procedure or method for training professionals entering the field. The objective of this live course for reproductive-health professionals who perform embryo-transfer procedures is to learn the common best practices in embryo transfer and practice embryo-transfer techniques using a virtual reality–based simulator. Learners will use modules of progressive difficulty to develop motor and cognitive skills for performing embryo transfer. The hands-on portion of the course will provide virtually simulated operative steps with increasing levels of complexity, and will store performance metrics for all users for export in standard data formats. The goal is for practitioners to improve their embryo-transfer technique.

ACGME Competency
Patient care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Describe the steps of an embryo transfer procedure in humans.
  2. Discuss best practice for embryo transfer in humans.
  3. Implement the hands-on experience gained with the embryo transfer simulator in practice.

PC26: Procedure and Technique for Embryo Transfer in Humans

(half-day hands-on course – afternoon with the ASRM Embryo Transfer Simulator)

Faculty

James H. Segars, M.D., F.A.C.O.G. (Chair)
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Alan S. Penzias, M.D.
Boston IVF
Thomas L. Toth, M.D.
Boston IVF
Valerie L. Baker, M.D.
Stanford University IVF/ART Program
Keith A. Ray, B.A.
American Society for Reproductive Medicine


Needs Assessment and Description

Reproductive-health professionals receive training in various aspects of assisted reproductive technology and other procedures comprising infertility treatment. There is, however, a widespread gap in training in embryo transfer. There currently is no standardized embryo-transfer procedure or method for training professionals entering the field. The objective of this live course for reproductive-health professionals who perform embryo-transfer procedures is to learn the common best practices in embryo transfer and practice embryo-transfer techniques using a virtual reality–based simulator. Learners will use modules of progressive difficulty to develop motor and cognitive skills for performing embryo transfer. The hands-on portion of the course will provide virtually simulated operative steps with increasing levels of complexity, and will store performance metrics for all users for export in standard data formats. The goal is for practitioners to improve their embryo-transfer technique.

ACGME Competency
Patient care

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  1. Describe the steps of an embryo transfer procedure in humans.
  2. Discuss best practice for embryo transfer in humans.
  3. Implement the hands-on experience gained with the embryo transfer simulator in practice.

Full Day

Half-Day